Use CAT For Strength Gainz

This post is about how focusing on speed will help with strength gains

If you’re not familiar with CAT, you’re missing out.Adding CAT to your training routine will help you make major progress in your strength. I’m not talking about your pet Mr. Whiskers. I’m talking about Compensatory Acceleration Training (CAT).

I have to say CAT has helped me make noticeable gains in the last couple months. My squat was stalled for a couple months and I realized I lacked speed in the movement. I mention this in a previous post Assault on The Squat pt.2 As I did more research I found CAT.

Background: CAT originated from a man named Fred Hatfield who also goes by the name Dr. Squat. It’s a good idea to take squatting advice from a guy with a name like that. Dr. Squat believed that you can get significantly stronger in your squats just from working on your squatting speed. He was the first person to squat 1000 pounds so I definitely had to look into this.

It all comes down to applying force. The key to moving 400 pounds is by applying more than 400 pounds of force, otherwise the weight won’t move. When Dr. Squat was preparing for the powerlifting meet in which he squatted over 1000 pounds, he would rarely squat more than 800 pounds. He was focusing on applying as much force on the bar as possible. Dr. Squat swears by this method and from personal experience, it works.

How To Use CAT: From what I know, the key to CAT is speed. From what I’ve read, its best used for deadlifts and squats. You’ll choose a weight that’s between 55 and 70% of your one rep max. When using CAT, you’ll lower the weight like you normally do.

The difference is when you’re rising back up. This is the part where speed comes in. The goal of the concentric/ rising part of the lift is speed. Try to move the weight as fast as possible throughout the entire concentric portion, and not just at the bottom of the lift.

How I use CAT: I use CAT for both my squats and deadlifts. I’ve been able to move heavy weight easier since adding CAT to my training. I normally do CAT deadlifts after doing heavy squats. I do 5-8 sets of 3 with amount rest in between. I do CAT squats after doing heavy shoulder presses. I also do 5-8 sets of 3 with a minute rest in between.

I like this rep scheme because it allows me to maximize the speed I use in each set. Also, the total volume is high enough for me to improve my muscle memory in the movement. To make things more fun, I like to pretend I’m using weight that’s heavier than my current max. It helps me be mentally prepared for the days that I lift heavier weights.

Closing Thoughts: Not only is using this training method effective, it’s fun too. As someone who’s into athletics, I like moving explosively. CAT has helped me improve my performance on heavy lifting days. I’ve had people tell me my heavy lifts look effortless. I think it’s because my body has because so used to applying large force on the lift, it’s natural now. I plan on using this in my training for the foreseeable future since I’ve been getting good results from it.

Here’s a couple links that also explain CAT.

https://boxlifemagazine.com/what-is-compensatory-acceleration-training-and-how-can-it-help-you-get-stronger/

https://www.google.com/amp/s/breakingmuscle.com/amp/fitness/compensatory-acceleration-training-speed-up-your-strength-gains

Photo credit: <a href=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/chriswojtewicz/26736265130/”>chris.wojtewicz</a&gt; on <a href=”https://bestrunningshoes.com/”>Best Running</a> / <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/”&gt; CC BY-SA</a>

Get Strong With Farmers Walks!

As I’m on my journey to get stronger and improve my overall fitness, I’ve improved my squats and deadlifts tremendously over the past year. One exercise I give a lot of credit to is the Farmers Walk exercise. I’m speaking from personal experience but I’m confident you’ll see improvements in those lifts if you start to incorporate Farmers Walks to your routine.The Farmers Walk is part of the weighted carries movement group. Done primarily in Strongman Competitions, anyone can benefit from this move.

There are countless benefits to doing the Farmers Walk. It builds great core strength because you have to stabilize the weight you’re holding on both sides. Your grip will improve sue to holding heavy weights for long durations. You do have to hold the weight tightly or else it’ll drop. Your legs get a good workout since you’re using your legs to walk. Your traps, lats, and others will be worked as well. This is a great total body exercise. The only training days I wouldn’t reccomend doing them are days you do heavy grip work, like deadlift days.

You can use Farmers Walks for any goal you want. You just have to adjust the weight, distance, and rest period for your specific goals. When focusing on strength, go heavier for a shorter distance, with long rest periods. For a cardio focus, go lighter, walk for a long duration, and have a short rest period. Hypertrophy would be medium weight with middle to long distance, and short rest periods. If you’re feeling ambitious, go heavy and walk a long distance.

Another way to utilize the farmers walk is to hold a dumbbell on only one side of your body. This move is called the suitcase carry. This move builds serious core strength because your core is walking hard to prevent you from tilting on one side. The heavier you go, the more engaged your core will be. I’ve been doing this move for the past couple of weeks and notice a difference in my core strength.

 

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